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Overwhelming Support For No Fault Divorce & Cohabitation Rights

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A recent YouGov opinion poll sponsored by family lawyers association Resolution found that almost three quarters (72%) of people don't think unhappily married couples should stay together because of the children and over two-thirds (68%) believe that couples should be able to divorce without blaming each other.

Resolution argues the poll provides yet more evidence of the need for significant UK family law reform, namely the introduction of and .

Spokesperson David Allison said: "Family issues are dominating the upcoming general election agenda with all parties developing and publishing policies aimed at the nation's families. Sadly many of these policies miss the point, fail to engage with the realities of family life in the 21st century and leave many families out in the cold.

"If unhappy families aren't going to stay together because of their children - . Politicians need to stop and engage instead with real solutions which support rather than judge families."

The YouGov poll also shows that 4 out of 5 people agree with the principle of financial support when a relationship ends, and almost three quarters (72%) of those who agreed with this principle believe that it should apply to couples in any relationship regardless of whether or not they are married.

Resolution represents over 5500 family lawyers in England and Wales and believes that couples should be able to divorce without blame after six months of separation and couples who live together should be given legal protection.

Currently, unless one spouse accuses the other of adultery or unreasonable behaviour, a couple can only obtain a divorce after two years separation.  Moreover, they cannot file for a divorce jointly, even if they want to - only one party can petition to end a marriage.  Read to learn more.

As for unmarried cohabitees, under present law they are afforded significantly less rights and legal protection than their married counterparts - read published by Advicenow to learn more.

Alternatively, you may want to .  You can in your area for free via , which can also help you to understand the best course of action for your situation and whether you are even ready to a .

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