The Solicitor - The FindLaw UK Life, Family and Workplace Law Blog

New digital legal aid system 'not fit for purpose'

The chair of family group Resolution has condemned the government's new digital legal aid system, stating it is 'not fit for purpose.

The chair of Resolution, Jo Edwards, has criticised the new system intended to deal with civil legal aid applications at Resolution's annual conference in Brighton on 17 April.

Ms Edwards has stated the system has had problems since it was trialled in the north-east two years ago. Problems include the system functioning at very slow speeds and not recording information users had submitted.

Prime Minister, David Cameron, has promised to implement a system of "English votes for English laws" in time for the first Budget of a Conservative government, the BBC reports.

The Prime Minister, David Cameron, has vowed to create firm proposals for 'English votes for English laws' within 100 days of forming a new Conservative government.

In a speech announcing the first-ever English manifesto by a major political party, Mr. Cameron claimed that his party's proposed reforms are vital to preventing the UK falling into social disintegration.

Motoring law: Driver loses legal battle over £85 parking fine

A motorist has lost his Court of Appeal bid to overturn a fine imposed by a private parking contractor.

A motorist who appealed a "rip-off" fine imposed by a private car park operator has lost his bid to have the fine overturned by the Court of Appeal.

In April 2013, Barry Beavis, 48, a chip shop owner, was fined £85 by private management firm, ParkingEye, for exceeding the two-hour time limit in the Riverside retail car park in Chelmsford, Essex.

Human rights chief of the UN, Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein has said Sun columnist Katie Hopkins' comments on refugees and migrants are "unacceptable" and likens the language used to that of the Nazis.

On 17 April, Hopkins wrote an article for the Sun concerning people immigrating illegally to Europe from Africa across the Mediterranean.

In her column, Hopkins' wrote: "No, I don't care. Show me pictures of coffins, show me bodies floating in water, play violins and show my skinny people looking sad. I still don't care.

The Metropolitan police have announced they are currently looking into whether they can launch a criminal investigation into Lutfur Rahman, the former Tower Hamlets mayor who was removed from his post this week after being found guilty of corruption by the high court.

Mr Rahman had been found guilty of multiple counts of corruption yesterday, including vote-rigging, accusing his rival of racism and seeking spiritual influence through the use of local imams. Also, he has been found guilty of using local grants to buy votes and ordered to pay immediate costs of £250,000.

Mr Rahman has been removed from office, banned from seeking office again and may find himself being stripped of his profession as a lawyer after his was found to have been lying while on the stand.

The Metropolitan police have announced they are currently looking into whether they can launch a criminal investigation into Lutfur Rahman, the former Tower Hamlets mayor who was removed from his post this week after being found guilty of corruption by the high court.

Mr Rahman had been found guilty of multiple counts of corruption yesterday, including vote-rigging, accusing his rival of racism and seeking spiritual influence through the use of local imams. Also, he has been found guilty of using local grants to buy votes and ordered to pay immediate costs of £250,000.

Mr Rahman has been removed from office, banned from seeking office again and may find himself being stripped of his profession as a lawyer after his was found to have been lying while on the stand.

Education: Magna Carta to be issued to all UK primary schools

On the 800th anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta, the Magna Carta Trust has pledged to send a copy of the historic document to every UK primary school, the BBC reports.

In an effort to commemorate the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta and explain its relevance to contemporary legal and political events, the Magna Carta Trust has pledged to send a copy of the Magna Carta to every UK primary school.

On 15 June 1215, King John sealed the Magna Carta.

In an effort to combat growing concerns about animal sex tourism, Denmark has introduced legislation banning bestiality, Reuters reports.

Denmark has introduced legislation banning bestiality, closely following in the footsteps of Germany, Norway, Sweden and the UK.

Earlier this week, Denmark became one of the last European countries to impose an outright ban on bestiality.

Criminal law: Labour peer will not face charges over child abuse

Lord Greville Janner, who has been accused of abusing children while working as an MP for Leicester West, will not face charges after the Crown Prosecution Service deemed him unfit to stand trial.

Lord Janner had been accused abusing children during the 1970s and 1980s by 25 people. It is said he was able to access these children through his friendship with a children's care home manager developed through is time as an MP.

The recent allegations led to Operation Enamel, a police investigation that was initiated in 2013 by Leicestershire Police.

Opponents of fox hunting claim that the hunting ban is not being enforced uniformly across England and Wales, the BBC reports.

Animal rights groups have claimed that the hunting ban is not being properly enforced, particularly in the south-west of England.

The Hunting Act 2004 prohibits foxes being killed by dogs as part of a hunt in England and Wales.

A US court has given two chimpanzees the same legal rights as unlawfully detained prisoners, The Telegraph reports.

In what animal rights activists claim is a landmark ruling, a US court has given two chimpanzees the status of legal 'persons.'

Two chimps, Hercules and Leo, are currently being held at Stony Brook University, a biomedical research facility on Long Island, New York, where scientists are using them to study the evolution of human 'bipedalism' - the condition of having two feet or of using only two feet for locomotion.

Sir Oliver Popplewell, the former high court judged charged with leading the enquiry into the fire at Bradford City football club at the Valley Parade in 1985, has requested the police re-examine the fires that broke out on other properties connected to then Bradford City chairman Stafford Heginbotham.

Sir Oliver, who ruled the blaze at the football club appeared accidental, is concerned about the number of fires that started on other businesses owned by Mr Heginbotham, who died in 1995.

In 1985, Sir Oliver came to the conclusion the fire at the football club was accidental after a five-day inquest. However, based on research carried out by Martin Fletcher, an author who lost his brother, father and grandfather to the fire, Sir Oliver would like police to re-examine the fires connected to Mr Heginbotham.

Sir Oliver Popplewell, the former high court judged charged with leading the enquiry into the fire at Bradford City football club at the Valley Parade in 1985, has requested the police re-examine the fires that broke out on other properties connected to then Bradford City chairman Stafford Heginbotham.

Sir Oliver, who ruled the blaze at the football club appeared accidental, is concerned about the number of fires that started on other businesses owned by Mr Heginbotham, who died in 1995.

In 1985, Sir Oliver came to the conclusion the fire at the football club was accidental after a five-day inquest. However, based on research carried out by Martin Fletcher, an author who lost his brother, father and grandfather to the fire, Sir Oliver would like police to re-examine the fires connected to Mr Heginbotham.

The consumer watchdog Which? has called on the Competition and Markets Authority to investigate 'confusing and misleading' supermarket prices, ITV reports.

The consumer association Which? has filed a 'super-complaint' with the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) after finding supermarkets exaggerate discounts with questionable multi-buys, shrinking products and confusing offers.

According to the retail research group, Kantar Worldpanel, approximately 40 per cent of groceries in the UK are sold on offer - giving the false impression of savings being made.

European anti-monopoly regulators have brought charges against the Russian energy firm, Gazprom, for abusing its dominant position in the natural gas market, the BBC reports.

The European Union (EU) has initiated legal proceedings against Russian state-controlled gas giant, Gazprom.

The energy firm has been charged - under EU anti-monopoly legislation - with inflating wholesale gas prices and over-charging customers in Eastern Europe, which has quashed competition in the region.